Two total eclipses

Two total eclipses

This is not quite original idea anymore since similar (and fantastic!) image has been produced by Wang Letian and Zhang Jiajie, however I had this on my mind for a years. Fortunately, they say „even if two do the same, it is not the same“, and this is the only reason I don’t feel that much ashamed when publishing this image. The reason it took so long was I didn’t have this equipment before and I also had to be patient unless Prof. Miloslav Druckmüller finishes his very long-term (but deeply worthy!) works on my data of total solar eclipse 2017. Both faces of the Moon, during both total eclipses, were captured with same equipment (Canon 6D, MTO 1100mm, f10.5 on Vixen GP-2 mount) and in both cases I was lucky for good weather. Moreover, these are two subsequent (total) eclipses in the world, there was no such phenomenon in the period in between. So while on the left you can see part of spectacular solar corona during the mid-part of total solar eclipse on 21st August 2017 (the whole image will be published soon), on the right is the ending phase of total lunar eclipse on 31st January 2018, with its „turquoise“ effect on the edge caused by ozone in our atmosphere. In fact, the face of the Moon is visible in both cases thanks to our atmosphere – because of scattering (left) and refraction (right) of solar light in it. The next chance to catch and merge both subsequent total solar and total lunar eclipses will come next year (first lunar eclipse on 21st January will be followed by total solar eclipse on 2nd July, with no eclipses in between… and both will be visible over Chile and Argentina). So good luck!